Funded with a federal grant for Lifespan Respite awarded by the Administration for Community Living to the New York State Office for the Aging. Award Number 90L10023-02-2

Funded with a federal grant for Lifespan Respite awarded by the Administration for Community Living to the New York State Office for the Aging. Award Number 90L10023-02-2



Caregiver Self Assessment Survey

Caregivers alone provide 80% of all long-term care in NYS. NYSCRC understands the unique needs of caregivers. Through training and education, we focus on increasing caregiver access to respite resources. The Caregiver Self Assessment Survey is designed to assist caregivers in recognizing the importance of self-care. 

Click Here to print the survey

Click Here to take the survey on line



From Insight to Advocacy - Addressing Family Caregiving as a National Public Health Issue - National Alliance on Caregiving

An important paper that seeks to answer the broader question - What is the impact of caregiving on the public's health. An examination of the relationship between public health issues, public health policy and family caregiving.

Read the full paper Here

9 STEPS to RESPITE CARE for Family Caregivers of Persons with Dementia, Including Alzheimer's Disease - ARCH National Respite Network

Caregivers of family members with dementia including Alzheimer's disease (D/AD) may face special challenges. Sometimes, individuals with dementia or Alzheimer's disease have unique physical, emotional and behavioral conditions that require specialized care. For example, memory, decisionmaking abilities, and behavior associated with D/AD change over time. This results in changing roles within the family and the need for more intensive levels of care. Providing care can be complicated and challenging and will require careful planning.

It is important for you to be aware of a resource called respite care. Respite services can provide you with a much needed break away from your caregiving responsibilities and this fact sheet can help you find and use respite. Download the Fact Sheet (pdf)

Caregivers of family members with dementia including Alzheimer's disease (D/AD) may face special challenges. Sometimes, individuals with dementia or Alzheimer's disease have unique physical, emotional and behavioral conditions that require specialized care. For example, memory, decisionmaking abilities, and behavior associated with D/AD change over time. This results in changing roles within the family and the need for more intensive levels of care. Providing care can be complicated and challenging and will require careful planning.

It is important for you to be aware of a resource called respite care. Respite services can provide you with a much needed break away from your caregiving responsibilities and this fact sheet can help you find and use respite. Download the Fact Sheet (pdf)


Legislative Updates

Congressional Stories of Family Caregiving

Late last year, six members of the U.S. House of Representatives shared personal stories of their experiences with family caregiving. The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) partnered with the National Alliance for Caregiving and others to host the Congressional Stories of Family Caregiving Briefing. Supporters of the briefing included The John A. Hartford Foundation, AARP, and the Alzheimer's Association. Read the full proceedings report from the briefing here.


New Medicare Cares Coming Soon - Don't Get Scammed!

Changes are coming to your Medicare card. By April 2019, your card will be replaced with one that no longer shows your Social Security number. Instead, your card will have a new Medicare Beneficiary Identifier (MBI) that will be used for billing and for checking your eligibility and claim status. And it will all happen automatically - you won't have to pay anyone or give anyone information, no matter what someone might tell you.

Watch the video
 


Reports and Resources

Medicare Spends More on Socially Isolated Older Adults - AARP

Socially isolated older adults are at greater risk for poor health and death than their well-connected counterparts. This study is the first to examine whether social isolation also affects health care spending among older adults. By examining Medicare spending data, this study found that a lack of social contacts among older adults is associated with an estimated $6.7 billion in additional federal spending annually. It is important to note that prior research has shown that many family caregivers are at increased risk of social isolation if they provide significant assistance and experience a high caregiving burden. Read Report 


Family and Other Unpaid Caregivers and Older Adults with and without Dementia and Disability

Catherine Riffin, Peter H. Van Ness, Jennifer L Wolff, and Terri Fried
Journal of American Geriatric Society - Published early online: 20 April 2017

"A Yale-led study finds that while many family caregivers assist older adults with serious health problems like dementia and disability, the majority aid adults without those issues." Researchers recently reported in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, that this group of caregivers assisting people without dementia and substantial disability "had the largest number of caregivers experiencing caregiver burden and participation restrictions, and sizable proportions experienced depressive and anxiety symptoms and poor physical health, yet only a small minority accessed supportive services, including caregiver training, respite care, and support groups."

Read the Yale News story about the study and the view the journal article abstract.


To learn more, call:

1-800-342-9871

Or go to:

www.nyconnects.ny.gov